Whats in your survival kit?

Chat about surviving, preventing, and being prepared for emergencies in the Outdoors
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Crazinamatese
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Whats in your survival kit?

Postby Crazinamatese » Sun Sep 02, 2012 5:15 am

Here is my survival kit. I need to add some more items to it, but this is the bare minimum of what I carry into the woods while hunting, camping, scouting. I can fit this kit in my small back pack easily.

From left to right: Water proof bag, Petzl head lamp with red and clear light filter, Surefire flashlight with LED bulb and red lens filter, heavy duty caribener, Gerber Knife, butane lighter, small notebook with water proof paper,

Top row: Chem-light, bungee cords, 550 para-cord.

Bottom row: canteen cup, gerber hand ax.

Things I forgot to put in the pic: Gerber multi-tool, small mirror, cell phone, my camelback water bottle, extra batteries.
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Here is my first aid kit. Israeli bandage, field dressing, tourniquet, roll of gauze.
I need to add more to it such is some first aid tape and whatever anyone else can think of.

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The one who knows the most carries less!!!
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bigwoodsmn
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby bigwoodsmn » Mon Aug 26, 2013 2:24 pm

This thread is old but a new hunting season is approaching. Check out the SOS kit by deceased SERE instructor Gene Ward. Where I hunt it is important to have a fast option for getting out of the elements and making a fire.

http://www.survivalandoutdoorsafety.com/ss.html

The thin/strong plastic material for fast shelters is in the kit and zipties are used for lashing rather than cord, which saves time. Also, with the pitchwood-handle fire starter you can make tinder and get a fire started fast with one good hand, even if it is wet out. He teaches how in the video. This kit can help get you warm and dry in a pinch.

I recently bought a knife that has a firestarter in the handle. It's a small knife, with a 3 3/4" blade, but I don't split the pelvis or brisket when I dress a deer so a small knife is OK with me. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlwUbJS7BTI You can get one with a red or orange handle to help you spot it if you drop it.
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Zap
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby Zap » Mon Aug 26, 2013 2:38 pm

Image

:mrgreen:
"Forged in fire lit long ago. Stand next to me and you will never stand alone".
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bigwoodsmn
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby bigwoodsmn » Mon Aug 26, 2013 2:45 pm

Zap wrote:Image

:mrgreen:


That's awesome Zap!
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Zap
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby Zap » Mon Aug 26, 2013 2:51 pm

bigwoodsmn wrote:
Zap wrote:Image

:mrgreen:


That's awesome Zap!



Thanks!

Actually, I keep a cat tourniquet, Hemcon and fire starter in my pack. I may add an Israeli bandage after seeing the op's post.
Complete IFAK with Hemcon in each vehicle and the range bag.

Both the cat and Israeli bandage can be applied with one hand, definitely worth having and they take up very little space and weigh nothing.

JD can be poured on a wound to disinfect it.....or you may not want to waste it.... :lol: :lol:
"Forged in fire lit long ago. Stand next to me and you will never stand alone".
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bigwoodsmn
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby bigwoodsmn » Mon Aug 26, 2013 4:50 pm

One-handed CAT is a good idea...

I just asked my wife to bring me some jack with an ice cube... haha.
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PLB
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby PLB » Tue Aug 27, 2013 1:43 am

Zap wrote:Image

:mrgreen:

Lol!!!!

[ Post made via iPhone ] Image
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby BassBoysLLP » Mon Sep 23, 2013 2:26 pm

Zap wrote:Image

:mrgreen:


:lol: :L:
Melting snowflakes one at a time.
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moosehound
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby moosehound » Tue Sep 24, 2013 6:37 am

I also keep a bandana size piece of blaze orange in my pack. Easy for people to see if you need to be found.
I hunt whitetails all year long.
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby Badger » Tue Sep 24, 2013 6:45 am

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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby rancid crabtree » Fri Jan 03, 2014 1:06 am

I made this kit a few years back. I teach wilderness survival to the Boys and Girls Scouts. I will have Wilderness survival merit badge weekends where I have the kids make a kit based on what they think they will need to survive 3 days in the wild. (You would be surprised to see what some kids think they need to survive) I stress that they need to make a kit that covers the basics like shelter, water procurement and purification, Signaling, fire starting, first aid and food.The second day they have to make an impromptu shelter and spend a night in it. Spending a night alone in the woods in a shelter that you made, helps remove the biggest fear that people have about getting lost. Here is the kit I made. It weighs six pounds and has 101 items/uses (some items have multiple uses) It even includes a tent that is 4 feet wide by 3 feet tall by 8 feet long.

The entire kit kits into a fanny pack with multiple pockets. If it is not comfortable and easy to take along, you will end up leaving it at home, or in the truck.

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This is my son Jake modeling the pack

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Here is the left side pockets as packed

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Here is what is in the pockets

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A rain poncho which can also be a shelter and a water gathering device and it's bright orange so it can be a signaling device.
A Swiss Army multi function knife. (need I say more)
50 feet of mason twine which is by far the strongest and lightest stuff around (use your imagination for it's uses)
Safety pin
Compass
Hand warmers
A small flashlight
a few large pieces of aluminum foil folded into small squares which can be used as drinking and cooking utensils
A deck of cards because boredom will kill you and it stresses the fact that you need to stay still (don't get more lost) You can use them for starting fires too
food including homemade granola bars and jerky, beef bullion cubes, sugar packets, gum and hard candy

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The right side pockets as packed

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Here is what is in the pockets.

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Another rain poncho
A large black plastic garbage bag for shelter and water gathering
it is wrapped with bright orange signal tape
A signal mirror (plastic, not glass)
A whistle
A PAL survival flashlight which I also use for fire starting
Water purification tablets
A bottle of denatured alcohol for fuel for my stove
a mesh stand for my stove

The center or main pocket as packed

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Here is what is in the pocket

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The tent which I made from rip stop nylon and waterproofed ( will explain more later )
A Kutz-All saw ( I will explain more later )
50 feet of parachute cord
A Mylar space blanket
An Altoids tin that contains another saw (I will explain more later) the tin is also the stand for my stove.
The soda can stove ( I will explain later )
A glow stick
Toilet tissue ( the single biggest moral booster there is ) It is also a fire starter
A first aid kit
A fire starting kit ( I will explain later) The tin is also a cooking and drinking vessel

The tent

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Made from rip stop Nylon and bug netting. It has a zippered front entrance.
The tent poles are made from aluminum arrows that I cut down. They nest together for storage but slide together when assembled
Tent lines from mason twine
tent stakes
A large piece of Tyvek house wrap to act a floor to keep you off the wet ground. (very light weight and very hard to rip )

This is a pic of the tent made out of blue nylon

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The Kutz-All saw

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It has a hollow handle to store the blades which are really Sawz-all blades including a knife blade

the zip saw and the tin

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The soda can stove

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This stove, when filled with the denatured alcohol fuel will burn for 25 minutes and bring a container with 2 cups of cold tap water to a boil in 2 1/2 minutes
The fire starting tin or the tin foil will be the cooking vessels

The first aid kit is pretty basic but I added an instant scab powder that stop bleeding instantly

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The fire starting kit as packed

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The contents of the kit

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A small flint and steel
A blast match ( a one handed flint and steel)
Steel wool, which is the worlds best tinder. I use the 9V battery from the PAL light and the steel wool as a very fast fire starter.
Small birthday candles
Wax paper ( another good tinder when wrapped around small sticks and pine needles )
A butane lighter with a built in light
Sugar packets and a container of Potassium permanganate. I can eat the sugar or mix it with water to drink. The Potassium permanganate
when mixed with sugar makes an excellent fire starter if you use the fire by friction method (bow and drill) It is also a signaling device as it
turns bright purple when sprinkled on snow. It is also a water purification powder (an oxidizer) if you use more of it in some water it is an
anti bacterial wash
Water proof/wind proof matches (only one shown)
A small vile of magnesium shavings for instant and hot fire starting
Large candles
Rubber Bands ( I'm not sure why they ended up in the fire kit but still good to have)
A cotton make up removal pad soaked it melted paraffin wax is another good waterproof tinder
Alcohol wipes for cleaning and also a good tinder
The fishing kit just fit nicely into the tin as well

I keep several methods of fire starting in my fire box in my survival kit.

1. Waterproof/windproof matches
2. Butane lighter
3. Blast match
4. Flashlight (more later)
5. Steel Wool

More important that the actual method of striking the flame or the spark is the next step. What do you strike it onto??????????
Good Tinder is the key. A whole box of matches is useless if your trying to light a log on fire. I think the absolute best tinder in the world is 0000 Steel Wool.
Steel wool weights almost nothing, compresses/fits into whatever container it's placed in. Works even when wet, Never goes bad, ignites with every known
spark flame method (even a magnifying glass) It burns really hot, the more you blow in it. The hotter it gets. lasts a long time so it will ignite the next lager pieces of tinder. I tell all my Scouts that Steel wool is the first thing they should put into their fire starting kit.

The Blast match and the flashlight are about the easiest methods to use for one handed fire starting. Position your steel wool nest into your bundle of tinder and push down with one stroke of the blast match to ignite the wool. You will be amazed at the amount and heat of the sparks generated by the blast match. Blow on the steel wool and add tinder and you will have a fire in no time.

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A similar method is to use my flashlight. It is another good one handed fire starter. For this you need a flashlight that uses a 9 volt battery. other batteries will work too but require two hands to use. I use a PAL light because it is water and shock proof. It is a great light with incredible battery time due to the fact that it uses a singe bright LED. It even has a strobe feature. Take the 9 volt battery out of the light and press the two terminals against the steel wool. BLOW!!!

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My fire kit also contains a small vile of magnesium shavings that I make ahead of time. A survival situation is no time to be doing this with cold shaky hands. (which is another reason I don't care for matches) Sprinkle the magnesium shavings onto the steel wool and you have just boosted the heat range and fire starting capacity in your tinder nest by at least double.

I am sure I could leave out some redundant stuff and add more. I am always adding and subtracting from the kit.
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Re: Whats in your survival kit?

Postby Cheese » Fri Jan 08, 2016 8:36 am

I am always trying to cut down on what I pack into the woods. You should have a complete first aid kit in your hunting vehicle year round. Pl7s bkankets in case you get stuck in that Dixie mud. So when it comes to packing into the woods or to your stand, stick to the basics. I would guess that 90%, if not higher, of the injuries that are most likely to occur are going to involve a deep cut and/or broken bones. So to keep it light and useful I carry these for first aid:
1. Lighter. Obvious reasons.
2. A survival blanket packaged in a 3x3" package. Can keep you warm and more importantly, help prevent shock in a patient.
3. Paracord. At least a 50ft piece. Can be used to build shelter and as a turniqet. Or if used properly, can hold a splint in place for broken bones.
Most other items you carry with you anyways. Like a knife, a headlamp, cellphone, and extra batteries. A snake venom extractor kit is never a bad idea for $10 either during warmer months. These few items are designed to stabilize the injury so you can get back to the truck or go for help. And they can all fit in a little side pocket in your pack. Oh, butterflies close a cut as good as super glue but take up no room to carry and make it easier for Doctors to continue treatment.
I also recommend wearing your knife on your belt. If, God forbid, you fall out of your stand and are hanging in a harness, it could be hours until help arrives and you can only hang so long before your circulation is cut off and you can lose limbs. Mainly your legs. So hug the tree, cut the harness(if you don't have quick release buckles) and slide down. Keep it lite and simple but life saving. Safety should always be paramount in your travels. I have minor disabilities so it is easy for me to remember safety but youngins' are invincible and tend to be in a hurry more. Most important of all..Stay Calm

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