2017 Season in Photos

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JoeRE
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Re: 2017 Season in Photos

Postby JoeRE » Sun Jan 21, 2018 11:32 am

rutjunkie wrote:Joe sounds like i should be switching from sst loads. Might have to try some barnes out. Would you care to elaborate on how much powder and trajectory you are getting. Seems like i always learn something from your post :D


rochester coops wrote:I saw your coat in the other thread, and was going to ask you about it. That is awesome! Just wondering though if you think someone could just buy a fleece jacket and stitch the hides to the outside instead of making the entire coat? Also, on the bullets, are those the Barnes Spit-Fire MZ or the TMZ with the plastic tip? Really appreciate the detailed write ups you give us!


Sure guys. I am shooting the 195 gr .400 Expander that has a B.C. of .17 I believe. I wish Barnes made the Spit Fire in .40 diameter, it would have a better B.C. But the expander is the only one made in the 195 gr .40 cal size I believe.

Some people freak out over shooting that "small" of a bullet at a deer, much less at long range, but to me that's still a big bullet and its a well made bullet too. And I am pushing it pretty darn fast. There is a big difference between lobbing 300 gr bullets at deer @ 1800 fps and what my gun is doing @ 2200 FPS muzzle velocity.

I have heard the rule suggested that you should have at least 1,000 foot pounds of KE at impact for a deer bullet. According to my balistics calculator I had 717 foot pounds of KE at 230 yards on this buck. Even this "small" 195 grain muzzleloader bullet, is still a big bullet, and its momentum (not so much KE) still can break shoulder bones at that range. My bullet penetrated through about 24" of soft deer tissue as he was quartering away, dead centered a rib and then cracked the off side shoulder blade which is where it lodged. It certainly doesn't drop deer on impact but very few muzzleloader shots do that with any load. I know it will get the job done.

Here's the stats on the load:

110 gr of Blackhorn - muzzle velocity of around 2200 fps, haven't shot through a crono but the trajectory fits that velocity which is published for that load.

100 yds +3"
200 yds -4.5"
300 yds -31"

I used to shoot 120 grains of blackhorn, and got a bit more velocity, but slightly worse accuracy....maybe 3/4" groups @ 100 yards instead of 1/2" if I was doing my part on a good day off sandbags obviously.

As you can see the bullet starts dropping like a rock beyond 200 yards. Nobody has any business shooting out that far w/o a ton of practice before hand and a ballistic reticle is just about mandatory. I have slowly worked out to taking shots on deer at longer ranges over the past 10 years.

By the way, yea I was seriously considering buying a jacket liner and stitching the coyote fur shell to it. I decided not to just because to get a good fit, I would have had to take the jacket liner apart and use that as a pattern for the fur, then stitch everything back together, which was as much work as doing it all from scratch. I wanted them to fit together well not be missmatched. The fleece liner I put together using a sewing machine so that didn't take very long.


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NorthwoodsWiscoHnter
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Re: 2017 Season in Photos

Postby NorthwoodsWiscoHnter » Sun Jan 21, 2018 2:04 pm

Awesome season! Congrats on your success and thanks for sharing! It was a really great read!
Northwoods Wisconsin Hunter is devoted to the working hunter who strives for success in the bigwoods. In bigwoods hunting, nothing is given only earned.
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mt008
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Re: 2017 Season in Photos

Postby mt008 » Sun Jan 21, 2018 3:44 pm

Thanks for writing this up Joe! I enjoy the tactics sprinkled into the story line. That's a nice set of deer, and critters for the year. Curious on your morning sets in the hills how early you are traveling and getting into stand? I assume your sitting up on the fly. Are you using a tree saddle or a hang on with sticks? What factors put you on these hill beds in the morning versus night? Is it your approach and taking advantage of thermals?

thanks!
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Re: 2017 Season in Photos

Postby MikePerry » Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:09 pm

Awesome!
Persistence pays!!!
JoeRE
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Re: 2017 Season in Photos

Postby JoeRE » Tue Jan 23, 2018 3:27 am

mt008 wrote:Thanks for writing this up Joe! I enjoy the tactics sprinkled into the story line. That's a nice set of deer, and critters for the year. Curious on your morning sets in the hills how early you are traveling and getting into stand? I assume your sitting up on the fly. Are you using a tree saddle or a hang on with sticks? What factors put you on these hill beds in the morning versus night? Is it your approach and taking advantage of thermals?

thanks!


I have spent a lot of time thinking about morning versus evening bed hunts and what I do versus what most other hunters seem to favor. General consensus is evening sits are better. In my experience, mornings have been better. I am pretty sure the biggest reason for these differences is deer densities. Where I hunt in Iowa, its incredibly hard to approach most buck bedding without blowing deer out on the way in. If I bump deer down a ridge line, it usually clears out the whole ridge. Now, there are ways around that, if its windy or rainy that helps a ton getting in undetected. So does early season foilage. But overall, thats why I typically favor morning hunts. 2/3 of the spots I pick for bed setups I don't think I can get into in the evening.

On top of that, often the bedding I am hunting is in a corner of public land, or even across the fence and I am just hunting the travel route. It would be easier if I was hunting huge blocks of public land but Iowa doesn't have much of that. Even 1000 acres isn't that big when you discard 80% of it for having too much human intrusion.

Do I bump deer out of the bed in the morning? Yep. But it seems to be less often than I would if I tried to get close in the evening with every set up. I am also very picky about my morning hunts. I want good conditions for the spot. Early season I prefer cold fronts. Pre-rut helps keep bucks on thier feet a little longer but I also want the right conditions. I avoid stangnant weather. My buddy's buck this year was killed in a low setup that was sheltered from the cold hard wind. My late season buck was killed in the morning on a sunny southerly exposure on a frigid day. Of course its a lot easier to stay 200 yards back and pick one off with a gun. Regardless, conditions concentrate deer in certain areas I am certain of that.

For my hunts morning or evening I use a saddle. When I'm not hunting on the ground anyway- that's been discussed elsewhere. I haven't packed in a stand anywhere for 2 or 3 seasons now. In the evening, I do sometimes go in and pick a tree. For a morning hunt I pretty much always have a tree picked out (shot with GPS) ahead of time from scouting. I have very little confidence in picking a good kill tree in the dark...some guys have pulled that off and wow, hats off to them. Every time I have tried that, was a disaster.

My access is often right in through bedding in the morning. I don't care about the ground scent much, that is the beauty of hunting completely mobile and not planning on coming back - at least for quite a while. We all need to prioritize what we worry about, and it helps me to cross that off my list. I often come in from below, and yes that keeps falling thermals in my favor. Really though the #1 rule is come in where the deer aren't. So in the morning I avoid food and travel routes close to food. Might be high might be low. I try to stay on the downwind side of those areas too, or at least just several hundred yards away. I have passed by fields of deer 300 yards away downwind and not seemed to have problems with it. If I know that is happening usually I move fast past there. I think in farm country that is easier to do. In big woods where human scent is more foreign, thats a bigger no-no. I am learning that as I slowly gain experience hunting in northern WI...

I used to be one of those guys who would climb up 2-3 hrs before daylight to be on the safe side. Then I had kids and every minute of sleep is a blessing :lol: So the last 2-3 season I usually come in just before daylight. Sometimes even grey light. Its that, or not hunt that morning. And guess what - I haven't seen a difference in success! My theory is depending on location and buck, some will be browsing around their beds far before daylight. You will blow them out regardless in the morning. All others seem to move into the area of their day beds after full daylight. There doesn't seem to be much in between - they are there either hours before daylight, or around sunup or after that. Another thing that helps is when you know food sources, or does, are a distance from the bedding. Longer travel routes do seem to help morning bed hunts - as long as there isn't a ton of hunting pressure close to the bed obviously.

If I don't think there is a chance to get close to the bed in the evening, and I have a 50/50 chance of getting in clean in the morning with good conditions, then I pick the morning every time.

My hunt last fall for a huge main frame 10 pointer that I mentioned a few posts ago - I spooked what I think was him getting in 1/2 hour before daylight. I suspect he was hanging out in there for a while already. There was a lot of sign in the thick stuff that I was setting up in, big beds all over the place, and it reeked like mature buck. I could see 4 recent beds within 50 yards of my tree I was set up in and I was right on the downwind edge, seemed perfect for him j-hooking in. I might have tried to get in there 2 hrs earlier and still blew him out. The thing is though he was at least 100 yards from me in thick cover and there was no wind right when I was getting to the base of the tree I picked out and he took off like a freight train. He heard me, didn't smell me. If it had been windier...or maybe some rain, I might have managed to get set up clean. Or maybe I could have taken 1 step every couple minutes and made it the last 50 yards... I can dream about what might have been..... 8-)
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stash59
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Re: 2017 Season in Photos

Postby stash59 » Tue Jan 23, 2018 4:10 am

Just goes to show there's no set rules. Thanx Joe!
Happiness is a large gutpile!!!!!!!
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Re: 2017 Season in Photos

Postby PassThrew » Fri Feb 09, 2018 4:40 pm

Nice Job JoeRE! You are a straight up Killer!

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