Making the connection through observation

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mainebowhunter
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Making the connection through observation

Postby mainebowhunter » Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:27 am

After listening to the W2H podcast, one of the things that stood out to me the most was how guys go about getting in season, up to date data on what they deer are doing NOW. I think sometimes its hard to make the connection between using the data that was collected the year previous and most recent intel. The connection between those pieces of data is how they go about their observation. Joe uses tracks and Jesse is big on glassing.

If your trying to kill bucks in Sept and early Oct. the areas you hunt are really going to dictate what methods work best for you. I try to use as many as I can from track reading, cams and observations. But we all have preferred methods.

When I hunt the midwest during Nov, I rely more on sign reading, terrain and observations than I do trail cams. In my homestate, rely more on cameras to give me that same kind of data. That means more cameras and figuring ways to use them as low impact as possible. Cell cams really have added a whole new element to getting up to date intel on what the deer are doing this season. Using a mix of cameras that I leave and do not hunt to cameras I walk past and check every 3-4 days.

How are you getting that up to date intel?


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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby Whitetailaddict » Tue Feb 13, 2018 4:45 am

In season scouting and cross referencing them with previous history through trail cameras or sightings especially in areas I have to travel a good distance too. I like trail cameras in areas I can check more frequently but I think once you have a target trying to figure out your next move through observations helps a lot.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby mainebowhunter » Tue Feb 13, 2018 5:01 am

Whitetailaddict wrote:In season scouting and cross referencing them with previous history through trail cameras or sightings especially in areas I have to travel a good distance too. I like trail cameras in areas I can check more frequently but I think once you have a target trying to figure out your next move through observations helps a lot.


100% agree...the issue is in places where glassing observation is not effective. Farmland, marsh, farmland, open timber...places you can see a distance or observe undetected work very well.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby ghoasthunter » Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:08 pm

in NJ I have every terrain available so my method is a blend of everything the more intel I can get the better my odds become before and during season. being able to adapt to my situation is my means for my success 100%
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby Boogieman1 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:14 pm

I really do not do any in season scouting. All my cameras are used to record data a year in advance. Then I will crunch that data in the post season to form a plan. Come summer I again put out cameras to verify target bucks survived and see what's on the menu.

Come hunting season I rely on historical data, common sense, terrain and patience.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby tgreeno » Tue Feb 13, 2018 4:42 pm

I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby checkerfred » Tue Feb 13, 2018 4:55 pm

tgreeno wrote:I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.


What kind of things are you going to look at for in season scouting? My problem is if you’re scouting you’ll leave scent in an area. Then what if you bust a buck out of his bed? That place will likely be shot. So I’m not sure what to look for in season. When I’ve scouted in season it’s been for rut sign to set up on right then or there OR it’s been for intel for the next year
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby Babshaft » Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:03 am

checkerfred wrote:
tgreeno wrote:I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.


What kind of things are you going to look at for in season scouting? My problem is if you’re scouting you’ll leave scent in an area. Then what if you bust a buck out of his bed? That place will likely be shot. So I’m not sure what to look for in season. When I’ve scouted in season it’s been for rut sign to set up on right then or there OR it’s been for intel for the next year


Perfect question. I want to add how far away from the bedding areas do you scout? If you can’t do an observation sit, because of the terrain, how do you observe if you can’t get in there? Cameras? Thanks.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby mainebowhunter » Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:46 am

Babshaft wrote:
checkerfred wrote:
tgreeno wrote:I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.


What kind of things are you going to look at for in season scouting? My problem is if you’re scouting you’ll leave scent in an area. Then what if you bust a buck out of his bed? That place will likely be shot. So I’m not sure what to look for in season. When I’ve scouted in season it’s been for rut sign to set up on right then or there OR it’s been for intel for the next year


Perfect question. I want to add how far away from the bedding areas do you scout? If you can’t do an observation sit, because of the terrain, how do you observe if you can’t get in there? Cameras? Thanks.


I utilize them all. BUT Cameras have been my biggest observation tool. Many of these bucks I am hunting, never see the light of day outside the timber. No ag. No glassing. Observation sits are not practical. Tracks...don't show all that well on leaves hard ground early season. BUT you need the intel.

To me, its one of the biggest keys these guys have figured out. EFFICIENCY. How to connect up your preseason/post season scouting with what is happening now. If you see big tracks coming into crops or you observe a big buck moving just before dark, you can make a move. If all you hunt is heavy timber or heavy swamp...you still need to get the same intel. One of my favorite buck spots, abuts a pit. I walk that pit looking for tracks that cross. I know that a buck is in the area based on the track. But many areas you have a tough time finding a big track.

Historical data is definite must. But killing mature bucks SOLEY based on it alone takes much longer to do in a season. Going out on a limb here...Jesse is not killing many of his target bucks opening day based on last years data. He has watched a buck do a certain thing from a ways away observing undetected.

Just because you bump a deer does not mean the area is shot. This year, I pushed a known bedding area, bumped up a 3.5yr old buck that I knew was bedding there. When I pulled camera, he was back there again that night. Killed a buck in 2012 out of a bed that I had bumped previously.

The way I see it, however I can get the intel, I need to get it. Sometimes it might be a mish mosh of a lot of different tactics. My brain is always working on ways to adapt to the particular areas that hunt. No sense trying to put a square peg in a round hole.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby Ridgerunner7 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:18 am

mainebowhunter wrote:
Babshaft wrote:
checkerfred wrote:
tgreeno wrote:I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.


What kind of things are you going to look at for in season scouting? My problem is if you’re scouting you’ll leave scent in an area. Then what if you bust a buck out of his bed? That place will likely be shot. So I’m not sure what to look for in season. When I’ve scouted in season it’s been for rut sign to set up on right then or there OR it’s been for intel for the next year


Perfect question. I want to add how far away from the bedding areas do you scout? If you can’t do an observation sit, because of the terrain, how do you observe if you can’t get in there? Cameras? Thanks.


I utilize them all. BUT Cameras have been my biggest observation tool. Many of these bucks I am hunting, never see the light of day outside the timber. No ag. No glassing. Observation sits are not practical. Tracks...don't show all that well on leaves hard ground early season. BUT you need the intel.

To me, its one of the biggest keys these guys have figured out. EFFICIENCY. How to connect up your preseason/post season scouting with what is happening now. If you see big tracks coming into crops or you observe a big buck moving just before dark, you can make a move. If all you hunt is heavy timber or heavy swamp...you still need to get the same intel. One of my favorite buck spots, abuts a pit. I walk that pit looking for tracks that cross. I know that a buck is in the area based on the track. But many areas you have a tough time finding a big track.

Historical data is definite must. But killing mature bucks SOLEY based on it alone takes much longer to do in a season. Going out on a limb here...Jesse is not killing many of his target bucks opening day based on last years data. He has watched a buck do a certain thing from a ways away observing undetected.

Just because you bump a deer does not mean the area is shot. This year, I pushed a known bedding area, bumped up a 3.5yr old buck that I knew was bedding there. When I pulled camera, he was back there again that night. Killed a buck in 2012 out of a bed that I had bumped previously.

The way I see it, however I can get the intel, I need to get it. Sometimes it might be a mish mosh of a lot of different tactics. My brain is always working on ways to adapt to the particular areas that hunt. No sense trying to put a square peg in a round hole.


Right on Maine! Lots of different ways. Trail cameras, glassing, tracks, word-of-mouth, observation stands. I try to utilize them all depending on the terrain, how much time I have, etc. Sometimes when I don’t have enough time to hunt I will aggressively scout another area that I really have no intention of hunting to get a feel of where the deer are, what action it’s getting and maybe even soft bump some deer around . This will give me some valuable Intel that I probably otherwise wouldn’t have had or spent time looking for. Maybe I will use that info the following year or maybe I’ll Stumble upon something that I can capitalize on in the current year. Not recommending that method but sometimes I will do that in those areas that I just don’t really prioritize or get to when I do have an hour or so to spare.

Jesse hunts an area that’s relatively flat with wide-open agriculture roll and small woodlot. Glassing is probably the most effective and safest technique for getting intel. Sneaking into those secluded woodlots in wide open ag land can be really tricky because deer use their vision so much and there isn’t much terrain to work with. He also loves going to Kansas and hunting prairie lands where he can utilize his glassing skills as well. He’s very comfortable in that type of setting. He’s also using historical data to an extent because he knows that that is the best time to kill those bucks in the areas he hunts. Those bucks become very nomadic and hard to keep track of in that wide-open agricultural land with tiny wood lots and they’re really hard to get on. Again he is typically going after a particular buck, not just a good one.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby Babshaft » Wed Feb 14, 2018 6:41 am

Thanks Andy, and thanks Maine. I'm going to have to work on a strategy for using cameras during the season to get some intel. I think my best bet will be using Canada's greatest resource - snow lol. I get snow pretty early in the season so I'll also need to be better at tracking mature bucks and using that intel to target specific bedding areas.

Thanks again for the help.
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby tgreeno » Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:24 am

Ridgerunner7 wrote:
mainebowhunter wrote:
Babshaft wrote:
checkerfred wrote:
tgreeno wrote:I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.


What kind of things are you going to look at for in season scouting? My problem is if you’re scouting you’ll leave scent in an area. Then what if you bust a buck out of his bed? That place will likely be shot. So I’m not sure what to look for in season. When I’ve scouted in season it’s been for rut sign to set up on right then or there OR it’s been for intel for the next year


Perfect question. I want to add how far away from the bedding areas do you scout? If you can’t do an observation sit, because of the terrain, how do you observe if you can’t get in there? Cameras? Thanks.


I utilize them all. BUT Cameras have been my biggest observation tool. Many of these bucks I am hunting, never see the light of day outside the timber. No ag. No glassing. Observation sits are not practical. Tracks...don't show all that well on leaves hard ground early season. BUT you need the intel.

To me, its one of the biggest keys these guys have figured out. EFFICIENCY. How to connect up your preseason/post season scouting with what is happening now. If you see big tracks coming into crops or you observe a big buck moving just before dark, you can make a move. If all you hunt is heavy timber or heavy swamp...you still need to get the same intel. One of my favorite buck spots, abuts a pit. I walk that pit looking for tracks that cross. I know that a buck is in the area based on the track. But many areas you have a tough time finding a big track.

Historical data is definite must. But killing mature bucks SOLEY based on it alone takes much longer to do in a season. Going out on a limb here...Jesse is not killing many of his target bucks opening day based on last years data. He has watched a buck do a certain thing from a ways away observing undetected.

Just because you bump a deer does not mean the area is shot. This year, I pushed a known bedding area, bumped up a 3.5yr old buck that I knew was bedding there. When I pulled camera, he was back there again that night. Killed a buck in 2012 out of a bed that I had bumped previously.

The way I see it, however I can get the intel, I need to get it. Sometimes it might be a mish mosh of a lot of different tactics. My brain is always working on ways to adapt to the particular areas that hunt. No sense trying to put a square peg in a round hole.


Right on Maine! Lots of different ways. Trail cameras, glassing, tracks, word-of-mouth, observation stands. I try to utilize them all depending on the terrain, how much time I have, etc. Sometimes when I don’t have enough time to hunt I will aggressively scout another area that I really have no intention of hunting to get a feel of where the deer are, what action it’s getting and maybe even soft bump some deer around . This will give me some valuable Intel that I probably otherwise wouldn’t have had or spent time looking for. Maybe I will use that info the following year or maybe I’ll Stumble upon something that I can capitalize on in the current year. Not recommending that method but sometimes I will do that in those areas that I just don’t really prioritize or get to when I do have an hour or so to spare.

Jesse hunts an area that’s relatively flat with wide-open agriculture roll and small woodlot. Glassing is probably the most effective and safest technique for getting intel. Sneaking into those secluded woodlots in wide open ag land can be really tricky because deer use their vision so much and there isn’t much terrain to work with. He also loves going to Kansas and hunting prairie lands where he can utilize his glassing skills as well. He’s very comfortable in that type of setting. He’s also using historical data to an extent because he knows that that is the best time to kill those bucks in the areas he hunts. Those bucks become very nomadic and hard to keep track of in that wide-open agricultural land with tiny wood lots and they’re really hard to get on. Again he is typically going after a particular buck, not just a good one.


I was on a similar thought process as Maine & Andy. All of the above! I ran no cameras during the season last year. That's changing. Did only 2 observation sits. Will definitely do more. And do more summer glassing/shining.

I have probably 50 different sets total. And maybe only hunted 35. So 15 of my set I never even set foot in all season. I could of completely missed the boat and never known a slob was in there. I want to scout sets I'm not really planning on sitting, just to make sure I'm not missing out on something really good. And if I do find great fresh mature buck sign, I may sit it that afternoon. I won't be going into the bedding but getting just close enough to checkout the area. And even if I do bust something out, maybe plan on sitting there next time the conditions are the same. Or maybe in 2-3 weeks.

I would rather be too aggressive, than not aggressive enough!
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby Babshaft » Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:19 pm

tgreeno wrote:
Ridgerunner7 wrote:
mainebowhunter wrote:
Babshaft wrote:
checkerfred wrote:
tgreeno wrote:I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.


What kind of things are you going to look at for in season scouting? My problem is if you’re scouting you’ll leave scent in an area. Then what if you bust a buck out of his bed? That place will likely be shot. So I’m not sure what to look for in season. When I’ve scouted in season it’s been for rut sign to set up on right then or there OR it’s been for intel for the next year


Perfect question. I want to add how far away from the bedding areas do you scout? If you can’t do an observation sit, because of the terrain, how do you observe if you can’t get in there? Cameras? Thanks.


I utilize them all. BUT Cameras have been my biggest observation tool. Many of these bucks I am hunting, never see the light of day outside the timber. No ag. No glassing. Observation sits are not practical. Tracks...don't show all that well on leaves hard ground early season. BUT you need the intel.

To me, its one of the biggest keys these guys have figured out. EFFICIENCY. How to connect up your preseason/post season scouting with what is happening now. If you see big tracks coming into crops or you observe a big buck moving just before dark, you can make a move. If all you hunt is heavy timber or heavy swamp...you still need to get the same intel. One of my favorite buck spots, abuts a pit. I walk that pit looking for tracks that cross. I know that a buck is in the area based on the track. But many areas you have a tough time finding a big track.

Historical data is definite must. But killing mature bucks SOLEY based on it alone takes much longer to do in a season. Going out on a limb here...Jesse is not killing many of his target bucks opening day based on last years data. He has watched a buck do a certain thing from a ways away observing undetected.

Just because you bump a deer does not mean the area is shot. This year, I pushed a known bedding area, bumped up a 3.5yr old buck that I knew was bedding there. When I pulled camera, he was back there again that night. Killed a buck in 2012 out of a bed that I had bumped previously.

The way I see it, however I can get the intel, I need to get it. Sometimes it might be a mish mosh of a lot of different tactics. My brain is always working on ways to adapt to the particular areas that hunt. No sense trying to put a square peg in a round hole.


Right on Maine! Lots of different ways. Trail cameras, glassing, tracks, word-of-mouth, observation stands. I try to utilize them all depending on the terrain, how much time I have, etc. Sometimes when I don’t have enough time to hunt I will aggressively scout another area that I really have no intention of hunting to get a feel of where the deer are, what action it’s getting and maybe even soft bump some deer around . This will give me some valuable Intel that I probably otherwise wouldn’t have had or spent time looking for. Maybe I will use that info the following year or maybe I’ll Stumble upon something that I can capitalize on in the current year. Not recommending that method but sometimes I will do that in those areas that I just don’t really prioritize or get to when I do have an hour or so to spare.

Jesse hunts an area that’s relatively flat with wide-open agriculture roll and small woodlot. Glassing is probably the most effective and safest technique for getting intel. Sneaking into those secluded woodlots in wide open ag land can be really tricky because deer use their vision so much and there isn’t much terrain to work with. He also loves going to Kansas and hunting prairie lands where he can utilize his glassing skills as well. He’s very comfortable in that type of setting. He’s also using historical data to an extent because he knows that that is the best time to kill those bucks in the areas he hunts. Those bucks become very nomadic and hard to keep track of in that wide-open agricultural land with tiny wood lots and they’re really hard to get on. Again he is typically going after a particular buck, not just a good one.


I was on a similar thought process as Maine & Andy. All of the above! I ran no cameras during the season last year. That's changing. Did only 2 observation sits. Will definitely do more. And do more summer glassing/shining.

I have probably 50 different sets total. And maybe only hunted 35. So 15 of my set I never even set foot in all season. I could of completely missed the boat and never known a slob was in there. I want to scout sets I'm not really planning on sitting, just to make sure I'm not missing out on something really good. And if I do find great fresh mature buck sign, I may sit it that afternoon. I won't be going into the bedding but getting just close enough to checkout the area. And even if I do bust something out, maybe plan on sitting there next time the conditions are the same. Or maybe in 2-3 weeks.

I would rather be too aggressive, than not aggressive enough!


Awesome man, thanks for the info. How close do think you can get to a bedding area when observing? How close for an observation stand and how close for setting/checking a camera? Particularly in large public swamps and marsh? I know it’s a tough question to answer but is there a general rule of thumb or place to start without having to do too much trial and error?

Thanks
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby mainebowhunter » Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:40 pm

Babshaft wrote:
tgreeno wrote:
Ridgerunner7 wrote:
mainebowhunter wrote:
Babshaft wrote:
checkerfred wrote:
tgreeno wrote:I think this is one of my biggest shortcomings. Once the season starts I love to hunt, and have to force my self to scout. I only have a couple cameras. So most of my intel is found thru observations sits & fresh track/rub sign. I hunt mostly evenings early in the season, and I'm going to force my self to scout areas in the morning to keep up on fresh sign! I felt like last year I was behind the bucks, because of not in-season scouting enough.


What kind of things are you going to look at for in season scouting? My problem is if you’re scouting you’ll leave scent in an area. Then what if you bust a buck out of his bed? That place will likely be shot. So I’m not sure what to look for in season. When I’ve scouted in season it’s been for rut sign to set up on right then or there OR it’s been for intel for the next year


Perfect question. I want to add how far away from the bedding areas do you scout? If you can’t do an observation sit, because of the terrain, how do you observe if you can’t get in there? Cameras? Thanks.


I utilize them all. BUT Cameras have been my biggest observation tool. Many of these bucks I am hunting, never see the light of day outside the timber. No ag. No glassing. Observation sits are not practical. Tracks...don't show all that well on leaves hard ground early season. BUT you need the intel.

To me, its one of the biggest keys these guys have figured out. EFFICIENCY. How to connect up your preseason/post season scouting with what is happening now. If you see big tracks coming into crops or you observe a big buck moving just before dark, you can make a move. If all you hunt is heavy timber or heavy swamp...you still need to get the same intel. One of my favorite buck spots, abuts a pit. I walk that pit looking for tracks that cross. I know that a buck is in the area based on the track. But many areas you have a tough time finding a big track.

Historical data is definite must. But killing mature bucks SOLEY based on it alone takes much longer to do in a season. Going out on a limb here...Jesse is not killing many of his target bucks opening day based on last years data. He has watched a buck do a certain thing from a ways away observing undetected.

Just because you bump a deer does not mean the area is shot. This year, I pushed a known bedding area, bumped up a 3.5yr old buck that I knew was bedding there. When I pulled camera, he was back there again that night. Killed a buck in 2012 out of a bed that I had bumped previously.

The way I see it, however I can get the intel, I need to get it. Sometimes it might be a mish mosh of a lot of different tactics. My brain is always working on ways to adapt to the particular areas that hunt. No sense trying to put a square peg in a round hole.


Right on Maine! Lots of different ways. Trail cameras, glassing, tracks, word-of-mouth, observation stands. I try to utilize them all depending on the terrain, how much time I have, etc. Sometimes when I don’t have enough time to hunt I will aggressively scout another area that I really have no intention of hunting to get a feel of where the deer are, what action it’s getting and maybe even soft bump some deer around . This will give me some valuable Intel that I probably otherwise wouldn’t have had or spent time looking for. Maybe I will use that info the following year or maybe I’ll Stumble upon something that I can capitalize on in the current year. Not recommending that method but sometimes I will do that in those areas that I just don’t really prioritize or get to when I do have an hour or so to spare.

Jesse hunts an area that’s relatively flat with wide-open agriculture roll and small woodlot. Glassing is probably the most effective and safest technique for getting intel. Sneaking into those secluded woodlots in wide open ag land can be really tricky because deer use their vision so much and there isn’t much terrain to work with. He also loves going to Kansas and hunting prairie lands where he can utilize his glassing skills as well. He’s very comfortable in that type of setting. He’s also using historical data to an extent because he knows that that is the best time to kill those bucks in the areas he hunts. Those bucks become very nomadic and hard to keep track of in that wide-open agricultural land with tiny wood lots and they’re really hard to get on. Again he is typically going after a particular buck, not just a good one.


I was on a similar thought process as Maine & Andy. All of the above! I ran no cameras during the season last year. That's changing. Did only 2 observation sits. Will definitely do more. And do more summer glassing/shining.

I have probably 50 different sets total. And maybe only hunted 35. So 15 of my set I never even set foot in all season. I could of completely missed the boat and never known a slob was in there. I want to scout sets I'm not really planning on sitting, just to make sure I'm not missing out on something really good. And if I do find great fresh mature buck sign, I may sit it that afternoon. I won't be going into the bedding but getting just close enough to checkout the area. And even if I do bust something out, maybe plan on sitting there next time the conditions are the same. Or maybe in 2-3 weeks.

I would rather be too aggressive, than not aggressive enough!


Awesome man, thanks for the info. How close do think you can get to a bedding area when observing? How close for an observation stand and how close for setting/checking a camera? Particularly in large public swamps and marsh? I know it’s a tough question to answer but is there a general rule of thumb or place to start without having to do too much trial and error?

Thanks


Swap that around...how far away can you get from bedding and still get the intel you need? Most guys observing are doing so in areas of human traffic, places that will not alert deer to their presence. Its why I don't observe with glassing. Mature bucks rarely see the light of day in open areas.

There will be a lot of trial and error. Thats all part of the game. It is constant adjustment. Again, the areas I hunt are unique...so my scouting and how I hang cameras is unique to my situation. We have apple trees in just about every piece of timber. I hunt them much like you would an oak island. If bucks are showing in daylight, I know they have to be bedded handy to the destination. Many of these bucks are moving less than 100yds before dark.

I take pics/intel from one season, work out my problems off season and then come back the next year and hunt on that intel. For observation I will hang cameras in a place that I can check that camera on the way to stand or in a place that bucks are used to humans. Last year, cell cams played a big roll in this. I learned so much from them last year because the intel was real time...I could instantly match up with fronts, moon position.

I am scouting another state right now, spending a lot of time scouting swamps with green briar. Spending time on a lot of the edges, running cams on travel corridors and scrapes. Completely different style of terrain. Completely different time of year. I don't plan on hunting there until late November and December.

Which brings up timing. If you listen to the podcast, you will here those guys talk about timing. Different times of year, different observation.
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tgreeno
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Re: Making the connection through observation

Postby tgreeno » Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:42 pm

Babshaft wrote:Awesome man, thanks for the info. How close do think you can get to a bedding area when observing? How close for an observation stand and how close for setting/checking a camera? Particularly in large public swamps and marsh? I know it’s a tough question to answer but is there a general rule of thumb or place to start without having to do too much trial and error?

Thanks


For observation sits, far enough away to not be detected and see as much areas as possible. Might be 100 yards, might be 250 yards. Last year I had a couple remote fields, I just walked into, and sat on the opposite side of the field from the bedding exit trails. Right on the ground. I'm not going to get my cameras real close to bedding. I want to just get pics of target bucks after dark. Then you know the bucks there, and you can gauge by how late it is, how fast he's moving that distance. And I'm gonna try some summer mineral blocks for inventory.

In past years, I've been lucky to get more than a couple bucks on camera. I rarely have a target shooter on camera before the season. Typically I'm hunting strictly by sign & pre-season scouting. So I'm changing it up this season.
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