Oak Identification from Aerial?

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Pullintoobs
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Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby Pullintoobs » Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:24 pm

Are any of you able to identify isolated Oak trees from an Aerial photo? I know Dan said in one of the vids from the challenge that Joe and him were able to identify oaks on them islands they hunted from aerials. At least I believe that is the case. I have been looking at aerials and I sure do not see any difference in the canopy. I looked at images of lone Oaks that I am aware of, and still can't. So how do you identify them?


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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby Dewey » Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:34 pm

If you use the history function on Google Earth to view different times of the year certain oaks are usually the last trees to lose leaves. Some hold on till late winter. Hard part is finding an aerial pic taken at the right time.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby Pullintoobs » Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:45 pm

Yep, i am having a tough time finding the right timeframe photos to be able to locate the brown leaves. Of course.
My house is on a 2 acre wooded lot that is 99% oak trees.
Tried comparing the canopy here at home, but not helping.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby stash59 » Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:49 pm

It depends on the available photos. The fall ones are the best to use. Most of the none oak hardwoods are yellow, orange or red on fall photos. Many times the oaks are still green or brownish.

Sometimes there are winter photos that can help confirm things. You can tell the oaks if they're bare in the winter pics by their shapes. Tip is to look at aerials of known areas of oaks and study what they look like at different times of the year. Although it can be tough when other nut bearing hardwoods are present.

So like most times. Boots on the ground confirmation is still needed. Besides you'll need to find out which ones are bearing each year. But this is a good way to find oak groves. Lone trees can be tough at times. But large ones can often still be seen.

Should mention this is on Google Earth. Using the time slide bar. On a computer not a smart phone.

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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby Jonny » Thu Oct 04, 2018 12:56 pm

It’s also an elevation issue as well. Google earth historical photos are by far the easiest if you can get a photo late September into October. Otherwise you can get a guess based on elevation and looking at aerials. I can tell if it’s big trees or small trees, and if it’s high and big, it’s likely oaks (or by me clear cuts). Pines are obvious. Maples and oaks are where I struggle.

I have a lot maples on the lower elevation with pines, then swamp is the lowest. Obviously there is a bit of overlap and you won’t be able to pick out specifics, but it does come in handy for some areas. Plus oaks have a distinctive look from the top. Not perfect at picking it out, but I’m usually in the ballpark.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby ghoasthunter » Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:36 pm

Dewey wrote:If you use the history function on Google Earth to view different times of the year certain oaks are usually the last trees to lose leaves. Some hold on till late winter. Hard part is finding an aerial pic taken at the right time.

i also notice that trees that are holding more acorns hold leaves longer that year.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby ghoasthunter » Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:56 pm

water tolerance 1 pin oak 2 black oak 3 white oak 4 red oak 5 chestnut oak 6 some kind of brush oak? thats what my area has from swamp bottoms too mountain tops. best mast crops too target white oak, pin oak, chest nut oak. brush oak red oak and black oak are late season. and beech nut trees can be great when they are dropping heavy. bucks love them cuz they make a lot of dark shaded security cover. so next time your out scouting check the elevations of the trees your finding in relation too water then you will have a starting point for looking for certain trees. in relation to bedding you can determine when certain beds are used based on what the deer prefer too eat. every year its different but if you see certain trees are producing good you know where the deer pockets will be holding and where they will likely move too when they vanish on you.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby Dewey » Thu Oct 04, 2018 2:48 pm

ghoasthunter wrote:
Dewey wrote:If you use the history function on Google Earth to view different times of the year certain oaks are usually the last trees to lose leaves. Some hold on till late winter. Hard part is finding an aerial pic taken at the right time.

i also notice that trees that are holding more acorns hold leaves longer that year.

Good observation. I will have to pay attention to that. 8-)
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby TheBuckPsych » Thu Oct 04, 2018 11:10 pm

I was told just the other day by a buddy of mine who is someone i always pay attention too when he eithe posts on here or tells me something. Definitely a guy i look up too on here.
He says Look for oaks along transitions cause they get more sunlight and will be bigger because the fact they get more light
Then in hill country look for ditches along sides of ridges that when the acorns hit the ground they roll down the hill into the ditch and end up like feeding troughs
I was like wow that makes total sense. Never thought of the little details like that.
Oaks from what ive read and learned are always in higher elevations too. They cant grow in really wet swamp areas. At least in my areas they dont. I believe They have too have some solid ground too root up
I always look for late fall pics with orange or rust colored trees. They are usually white oaks.
I also believe that white oaks hold their leaves the longest into the year. And we all know or have been told white oaks are deers favorite foods
Late winter pics i look for bare trees and try too look for elevation too confirm oaks or not. Other than than boots rubber is the only way too confirm.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby milkweed-militia » Fri Oct 05, 2018 12:21 am

Dewey wrote:If you use the history function on Google Earth to view different times of the year certain oaks are usually the last trees to lose leaves. Some hold on till late winter. Hard part is finding an aerial pic taken at the right time.



X2 here. If you have an area where you know there are oak trees in certain locations, look at it on an aerial and see if you can tell any differences in the foliage from the surrounding trees. You could apply that to new areas once you know what to look for. But, the easiest way is if you can use an aerial from late fall or early winter.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby Dpierce72 » Fri Oct 05, 2018 2:01 am

In my swampy areas I've had better luck identifying cedar trees, which are indicative of higher ground. And for my area, this can be important information.

I've looked through all historical data (as mentioned above) w/out luck identifying oaks. I've been particularly interested in Cow Oaks (swamp chestnut) as their leaves turn bright red and they are not extremely common everywhere here. I have not had luck because there is a fine window for the photo to be taken.

It's possible in the area Dan/Joe were hunting, the oaks were so few they stood out better. I'd be interested in learning more too.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby creepingdeth » Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:16 pm

Dewey wrote:If you use the history function on Google Earth to view different times of the year certain oaks are usually the last trees to lose leaves. Some hold on till late winter. Hard part is finding an aerial pic taken at the right time.

X2
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby The Cheese » Sun Oct 06, 2019 2:29 pm

Red Oaks have a round cluster of canopy when looking from above. White Oaks grow less symmetrical during the leafy months. Because of that, they tend to rule the roost where they grow in packs making them the tallest trees between the 2 where they grow together. Since they are the tallest, from a satellite view they look the whitest when the leaves are gone.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby The Cheese » Sun Oct 06, 2019 2:36 pm

The round canopy is the easiest way to tell.
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Re: Oak Identification from Aerial?

Unread postby whi52873 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:49 am

As a tip, when looking at hardwoods and using a summer time aerial pic....the more round and darker green canopies are 90% of the time white oaks. For example, the area I circled in red is a huge white oak flat but this serves true in other areas where white oaks are less dense.
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